Cooking Up the Semantic Web

How to make machines meaningfully manipulate information?

In 1989 hardly anyone could have imagined an informational space where all the information from a variety of computers, file formats and networks are linked. Except for one person: sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web.

Back then, at CERN, he was working on his vision for the Web, which in its very essence was about “anything being potentially connected to anything”.

“Vague, but exciting”

were the words Mike Sendall, Tim-Berners Lee’s boss wrote on the proposal, allowing him to continue.

Yet, as exciting and disruptive as this is, the Web hasn’t reached it’s full potential. There’s one more layer to be built – a standard model for data interchange on the Web.

Check out our latest slides “Cooking Up the Semantic Web” and learn why, as far as data are concerned, the Web is far from done.

 

Teodora Petkova

Teodora Petkova

Teodora is a philologist fascinated by the metamorphoses of text on the Web. Curious about our networked lives, she explores how the Semantic Web vision unfolds, transforming the possibilities of the written word.
Teodora Petkova

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