The Future is NOW: Dynamic Semantic Publishing

News On the Web logoThe future of publishing is now.

.

More and more organizations are looking for solutions that fuse the manual editorial content creation and curation with smart automated processes for aggregating, repurposing and reusing content. Today, improved user experiences and high levels of readers engagement aren’t only a matter of bright editorial management and journalistic acumen anymore.

.

Bring on the semantic technologies applied to online publishing.

.

What is Dynamic Semantic Publishing?

.

As opposed to static, manually authored web pages, dynamic semantic publishing is about automated content serving, clustered around topics, interests, preferences. This is a hybrid approach to text and data that revolutionizes the way readers consume media and transforms the way publishers create, store and serve content.

.

Content that Assembles Itself

.

Think of dynamic semantic publishing as content that assembles itself. The technology allows for an automated dynamic aggregation and publishing of content, based on:

.
  • reader’s activities (searches, reading history)
  • interconnections (relationships between things, places, people)
  • metadata (data about data)
.

To enable this type of content assets management, dynamic semantic publishing harnesses the power of semantic technologies such as RDF, OWL, SPARQL. The automatic generation of content, based on metadata (stored in an RDF database), lies in the core of this particular type of publishing. (If you want to get to the heart of the matter of the technology, check our whitepaper: to be added soon)

.

The Trailblazers from BBC

The first to use dynamic semantic publishing are the BBC.

.

In 2010, the Lead Technical Architect for the News and Knowledge Core Engineering department of BBC back then – Jem Rayfield, decides to move away from traditional publishing solutions and implement semantic web technologies on BBC’s FIFA World Cup 2010 page (read more about the story and the technicalities behind the implementation here: BBC: Dynamic Semantic Publishing). After the success of the new approach, this type of managing and publishing content was also implemented for BBC’s 2012 Olympics site as well as for their redesigned Sports site.

.

The BBC Olympics section powered by the semantic technology via GrahDB

.

Several other high-profile sites saw the benefits of dynamic semantic publishing and followed suit, implementing it into the management of their content assets: The New York Times, Associated Press, The Financial Times to mention but a few.

.

Key Benefits of Dynamic Semantic Publishing

.

A system that lets you dynamically interconnect content objects such as tags, concepts, terms and many others, is a game changer.

.

By aggregating relevant and timely content automatically, such technology minimizes the cost of manual content management and makes the best use of content assets.

.

Not only does it do all the heavy-lifting of organizing and categorizing information, but also opens countless opportunities for efficient content repurposing, reuse and relevant delivery. With dynamically generated pages readers are being served exactly the content they are interested in, when and where they need it.

.

A dynamic semantic publishing platform can:

.
      • Automatically create relationships between Things
        (people, places, events etc)

      • Automatically add tags, concepts and topics to content
      • Dynamically aggregate topic and profile pages
      • Create custom content streams
      • Reuse and repurpose content, based on variables
      • Provide tailored recommendations
      • Give related content and data as the user types
.
.

Dynamic Semantic Publishing - Topic Pages

.

Dynamic Semantic Publishing in Action: NOW

.

News On the Web (NOW) is a public service which showcases what semantic technologies can offer to online publishing. On the platform you can check for yourself how dynamic semantic publishing works: how content is being interrelated, connected, aggregated, searched through and navigated.

.

.

The platform relies on and produces rich metadata, represented in RDF, and stored in Ontotext’s GraphDB database. The architects of NOW have combined DBPedia 2015, WikiData, and GeoNames to create a high-coverage general purpose dataset, containing more than four million entities (i.e. people, locations, organization etc).

.

With NOW, you can get an idea of how semantically annotated texts enhance the delivery of content online. You can browse the streams and topics, search within the content, follow the links, related to each topic or entity, check people, places and things – how they relate to each other, what is trending, what concepts are usually associated with one another etc.

.

Find out what is possible for yourself, play with NOW and let us know what you think in the comments below.

Jarred McGinnis

Jarred McGinnis

Jarred McGinnis is a managing consultant in Semantic Technologies. Previously he was the Head of Research, Semantic Technologies, at the Press Association, investigating the role of technologies such as natural language processing and Linked Data in the news industry. Dr. McGinnis received his PhD in Informatics from the University of Edinburgh in 2006.
Jarred McGinnis

Related Posts

  • Revolution of Linked Open Data

    The Web as a CMS: How BBC joined Linked Open Data

    Editorial wants to create faultless content and it is hard for them to imagine that quality coming from anyone else but their team. The dilemma these days is how do you maintain that high-quality in an era of shrinking editorial budgets and ever increasing amounts of data. Early on the BBC decided not to mint their own IDs but to utilise existing URIs for musical artists from a freely available database MusicBrainz. BBC went further and made the strategic decision to also use its resources to help improve the MusicBrainz database.

  • Panama_papers_200x200

    Linked Leaks: A Smart Dive into Analyzing the Panama Papers

    Ever since the Panama Papers news story broke in early April, people have been curious to know what names come out and how they are connected with other companies and shareholders. However, releasing the massive of 2.6TB of data could be a challenge for data enthusiasts and investigative journalists to effectively search and explore the Panama Papers data. That’s how Linked Leaks was born.

  • Journalism in the Age of Open Data

    Journalism in the Age of Open Data

    Open Data has the potential to enrich the sources for journalists and give the stories they tell new perspectives. Journalism, in turn, filters open data to discover new angles to topics and tell richer stories to the audience. However, to turn data into meaning, we need context. Semantic technology provides that context allowing media organizations to extract better insights and ultimately improve story telling capabilities.

Back to top